Jan 26 – Films of Vision and Hope presents “The Last Crop”

Films of Vision and Hope Presents

The Last Crop

Join Transition Silicon Valley and World Centric for a special showing of a new film about agriculture in the Bay Area.

Filmmaker Chuck Schultz will be present for a showing of his film, The Last Crop. This is his story of farmers Jeff and Annie Main, their Good Humus Farm and how they are planning to preserve it as a working, organic farm for future generations. After the film, Chuck will lead a discussion about issues farmers encounter in staying on the land and what we can help them do about them.

THURSDAY, January 26, 2012
6:30 Meet and Greet
7:00 – 9:00 Film and Discussion
World Centric, 2121 Staunton Ct, Palo Alto CA 94306

“Sustainability is the big new catch phrase but what does that mean? Does it mean that we take care of our soil? Does it mean we take care of our water sources and our air? The true issue to me is sustaining farmers” – Annie Main, Good Humus Farm

Suggested Donation to help defray travel and film costs: $5.00 – $10.00

Trailer for film
Film website

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Anaerobic digesters in Palo Alto?

Transition Palo Alto member David Coale writes:

I’d like to invite you to a presentation on the potential for anaerobic digestion to convert Palo Alto’s 60,000 tons/year of organic waste into green energy and high quality compost.

The presentation will be on Wednesday, March 24 at 7pm at World Centric, 2121 Staunton Court in Palo Alto.
World Centric is located behind JJ&F Market on the opposite corner.

Anaerobic digestion has the potential to save the City more than $1 million per year while reducing our greenhouse gas emissions by 20,000 tons of carbon dioxide equivalent per year. It could generate $1.4 million worth of green energy, enough to power 1,400 homes. Retiring our sewage sludge incinerator would save $800,000 worth of energy and $200,000 in waste ash disposal. The compost would be worth $200,000 per year.

The only feasible location for an anaerobic digestion facility is at the entrance to the City landfill next to the Wastewater Treatment Plant, not far from where we currently compost. The challenge is that the landfill is scheduled to become part of the 126-acre Byxbee Park, and rezoning about eight acres (7%) for composting would require a vote of the people.

Come learn more about anaerobic digestion and how you can help make it a reality.

For more information, see the Anaerobic Digestion Factsheet (PDF) that David also sent.