April Fourth Friday/Films of Vision and Hope – ‘The Reluctant Radical’ and ‘Arrestable’

April 27, 7:15-9:30pm NOTE TIME CHANGE
Fireside Room, Unitarian Universalist Church of Palo Alto, 505 E. Charleston, Palo Alto
All ages welcome! FREE, Donations appreciated.

April Fourth Friday will take a close look at direct climate action — how activists are putting themselves on the line and turning up the heat to fight climate change.

  • THE RELUCTANT RADICAL is a documentary about climate activist Ken Ward, who turned to civil disobedience after working within environmental organizations for many years. (Scroll down for more about the film and for a link to the trailer.)
  • ARRESTABLE is a short video that follows activists in Seattle as they prepare for civil disobedience to urge local banks to stop funding fossil fuel companies.

We’re pleased to welcome the Peninsula Peace and Justice Center and 350 Silicon Valley as co-sponsors. We’ll include some time to discuss the films and share experiences and ideas about stepping up the climate fight.

reluctant radical

More about THE RELUCTANT RADICAL:
The film follows activist Ken Ward as he confronts his fears and puts himself in the direct path of the fossil fuel industry to combat climate change. After twenty years leading environmental organizations, Ken became increasingly alarmed by the scientific evidence of climate change and the repercussions for civilization. He now embraces direct action civil disobedience as the most effective political tool to deal with catastrophic circumstances.

The film follows Ken for a year and a half through a series of direct actions, culminating with his participation in the coordinated action that shut down all the U.S. tar sands oil pipelines on October 11, 2016. The film reveals both the personal costs and also the fulfillment that comes from following one’s moral calling- even if that means breaking the law. Ken Ward has no regrets, and his certainty leaves the audience to consider if he is out of touch with reality, or if it is the rest of society that is delusional for not acting when faced with the unsettling evidence that we are collectively destroying our world.

Director Lindsey Grayzel, co-producer Deia Schlosberg and cinematographer Carl Davis were three of four independent filmmakers to be arrested and charged with crimes for filming the activists on October 11, 2016. Their charges have been dropped, and they have joined forces to tell Ken’s story through this film. See the trailer

Sponsored by Transition Palo Alto, the Peninsula Peace and Justice Center, 350 Silicon Valley, and the Green Sanctuary Committee of UUCPA.

 

 

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Waste Not – and Enjoy!

It was a delicious and informative evening at the March Fourth Friday ‘Shop your Kitchen’ potluck. Participants raided their refrigerators, freezers, cupboards, and gardens to create tasty treats, from casseroles to pie to soup to nuts.

The group talked about creative recipe ideas, how to preserve produce, how to make better use of your fridge, and how your nose is better than any expiration date label.

We also showed some short videos about food waste. Some amazing facts: 40% of food produced in the U.S. never gets eaten. At the same time, about 1/8 of all Americans suffer from food insecurity.  Food waste is the biggest low-hanging fruit (so to speak) that we could tackle for an impact on climate change.  If food waste were a country, it would be #3 in climate emissions. And it’s a problem that everyone can help solve.

Special thank yous to Herb for lovely background music, and Debbie, Lawrence, and William for super KP duty!

Here are the video links:

The Life of Strawberries
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WREXBUZBrS8&feature=youtu.be

Three meals from one zucchini
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=t2MkLWbe7B0

Creative ideas about tackling the food waste problem
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6RlxySFrkIM

Look and See

February Fourth Friday attendees were treated to LOOK & SEE, a lovingly filmed portrait of farmer and poet Wendell Berry and the lives of his family and neighbors in Henry County, Kentucky.  Through Berry’s poetry, the reflections of others, and evocative photography and cinematography, the film captures a deep love of the land, sense of place, and values of land stewardship and hard work — and the heartbreak of loss as these treasured values are undercut by industrialized agriculture.

TPA was delighted to co-host the film with Peninsula Open Space Trust (POST), which has been working to protect open space in and around the peninsula for more than 40 years. Thanks to POST, UUCPA for providing their main hall, and to all who helped with the event!

As an additional treat, check out this recent Yes! Magazine article about Wendell Berry’s wife, Tanya, who was interviewed in the film.

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Rooms Available in Permaculture House

–Submitted by William Mutch
We have two vacancies coming up in April in the house on the land that I steward.  This is the house and land I write about often in the Transition Café announcements.  We are on ~four acres on a gentle hill above a neighborhood near the Saratoga/Cupertino border, covered in mixed Oaks and Grasses, and various wildflowers in Spring.  We’re building contour beds which will be home to various edibles, including Fruit and Nut Trees, Cane Berries, perennial Grasses, and much more.  The plan is to be harvesting loads of atmospheric carbon, storing lots of water in the soil, and creating habitat and food for humans and other critters.  One of the rooms could be excellent for a couple, another may be a good commuter room or studio.  Please forward our ad to any person or organization you think might be interested in hearing about it.  Craigs List ad
Thank you!
saratogahouseonhill@gmail.com

Bringing Permaculture to Life

Permaculture is a design framework that brings systems thinking and an ethical sensibility to the creation of environments that are not just sustainable, but also regenerative. Permaculturists start by observing how nature operates in forests and other natural settings, and then design environments that incorporate the natural patterns and relationships.

On January 26, Fourth Friday attendees were introduced to the diverse and inspiring world of permaculture. The film ‘Inhabit’ featured living permaculture projects on farms, in cities, in suburbs – ranging from a rooftop garden in the middle of New York City to an idyllic rural spread of many acres.

After the film, permaculturist and TPA steering committee member William Mutch answered questions and shared his own perspective on permaculture.  He explained that permaculture is based on ethics and principles — not a step-by-step process — and emphasized the importance of beginning with patient observation.

William also hosts the Permaculture Cafe, a weekly gathering of people who are interested in learning more about permaculture. The cafe is held every Wednesday 6-7:30pm at Red Rock Cafe in Mountain View.  If you’re on the TPA mailing list, you’ll get an announcement each week.

And to start learning more now about permaculture principles, ethics, and practices, you can go to permacultureprinciples.com.

 

Special February Fourth Friday – ‘Look & See’

We are pleased to welcome Peninsula Open Space Trust as a co-sponsor for this special Fourth Friday screening of LOOK & SEE.

look and see

As I see, the farmer standing in his field, is not isolated as simply a component of a production machine. He stands where lots of lines cross – cultural lines. The traditional farmer, that is the farmer who was first independent, who first fed himself off his farm and then fed other people, who farmed with his family and who passed the land on down to people who knew it and had the best reasons to take care of it… that farmer stood at the convergence of traditional values… our values.”
— Wendell Berry, Author, Activist and Farmer

LOOK & SEE revolves around the divergent stories of several residents of Henry County, Kentucky who each face difficult choices that will dramatically reshape their relationship with the land and their community.

In 1965, Wendell Berry returned home to Henry County, where he bought a small farm house and began a life of farming, writing and teaching.  This lifelong relationship with the land and community would come to form the core of his prolific writings. A half century later Henry County, like many rural communities across America, has become a place of quiet ideological struggle. In the span of a generation, the agrarian virtues of simplicity, land stewardship, sustainable farming, local economies and rootedness to place have been replaced by a capital-intensive model of industrial agriculture characterized by machine labor, chemical fertilizers, soil erosion and debt – all of which have frayed the fabric of rural communities. Writing from a long wooden desk beneath a forty-paned window, Berry has watched this struggle unfold, becoming one of its most passionate and eloquent voices in defense of agrarian life.

Filmed across four seasons in the farming cycle, LOOK & SEE blends observational scenes of farming life, interviews with farmers and community members with evocative, carefully framed shots of the surrounding landscape.  Thus, in the spirit of Berry’s agrarian philosophy, Henry County itself emerges as a character in the film – a place and a landscape that is deeply interdependent with the people that inhabit it.

RSVPs via EventBrite are required. Click for the official announcement, where you can scroll down to register.

Friday February 23, 7:30-9:30pm
Main Hall, Unitarian Universalist Church of Palo Alto,
505 E. Charleston, Palo Alto
All ages welcome! FREE, Donations appreciated.

Sponsored by Transition Palo Alto, Green Sanctuary Committee of UUCPA, and Peninsula Open Space Trust.

 

January Fourth Friday/Films of Vision and Hope – ‘Inhabit’

Join us for a close look at permaculture, the transformative approach to agriculture, economics, society, and governance, that inspired the Transition movement and much more.

Inhabit introduces permaculture projects, concepts, and people to help everyone understand what permaculture is all about.

Inhabit film.png

If you’re already familiar with permaculture, you’ll get a glimpse into what’s possible – what kind of projects and solutions are already underway and what actions you might want to take.

If you’re not familiar with permaculture, you’ll learn about this revolutionary way relating to the Earth.

For everyone, it will be a reminder that humans are capable of helping to heal our planet.

Filmmakers Costa Boutsikaris and Emmett Brennan documented more than 20 sites in a range of rural, suburban, and urban environments. They explored responses to local and global challenges, ranging from issues of food, water, and medicine, to governance, economy, and culture.  Come learn what they found out and share your own experience, ideas, and perspective. See the trailer…

Friday January 26, 7:30-9:30pm
Fireside Room, Unitarian Universalist Church of Palo Alto,
505 E. Charleston, Palo Alto
All ages welcome! FREE, Donations appreciated.

Fun and Games

A fine time was had by all at the first ever TPA Games Night.  Folks showed up with games, snacks, and a spirit of humor and adventure. Although Pictionary enthusiasts had trouble illustrating ‘ban’ and ‘unconscious,’ no one minded. And the Forbidden Island team did manage to get off the island successfully.

If you missed the evening, not to worry, we’ll do it again in the new year!

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